Friday Focus: St. Mary’s Animal Welfare League

The St. Mary’s Animal Welfare League helps cats, dogs and horses by providing SMAWL logoveterinary, fostering and adoption services. This week, we spoke with Katie Werner, President of SMAWL, who shared a favorite story about a particularly special dog and gave us the inside scoop on how you can help an animal find their “furr-ever” home.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: The St. Mary’s Animal Welfare League (SMAWL) is a nonprofit membership organization founded in 1990 that works to help the homeless, abused and neglected animals in our local community and — in times of extreme need — in our larger national rescue community. Immediate goals include aggressive campaigns to find homes for homeless cats and dogs and to curb pet overpopulation through spay/neuter programs. Future goals include the building of a no-kill shelter in St. Mary’s County. Services provided include pet adoptions, discount spay/neuter vouchers, monthly low-cost rabies clinics, humane education and the Pet Food Pantry. SMAWL is an all-volunteer organization and welcomes new members and volunteers. SMAWL offers a variety of volunteer opportunities, including fostering animals waiting for adoption. To contact SMAWL, call 301-373-5659, send an e-mail to smawl@yahoo.com, or visit www.smawl.org.

The Snowflake Society was created in 2006 as a division of St. Mary’s Animal Welfare League (SMAWL) to help horses and other hoofed animals. The mission statement of the Snowflake Society reads: “To provide shelter, care, rehabilitation and adoption services for abused, neglected, and unwanted horses and other hoofed animals; and to promote humane treatment of hoofed animals through education, investigation, and legal intervention.”

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: There are many favorite moments and all of our animal adoptions are reason to celebrate, but the most rewarding is when we are able to help those special animals that are considered “unadoptable.” Once such recent rescue is Martha, a blind Beagle we pulled from Tri-County Animal Shelter. We were fortunate enough to find a very special foster home that had a very special cat, Dutchess, who helped Martha adjust to her new home. Within half an hour of her arrival, Dutchess had introduced herself and was taking Martha on a tour of the house. She showed her where all of the water bowls were and the family set one up on the bathroom floor for Martha since she seemed to like that area. Dutchess decided they were sleeping together on the sofa that first night, so that was where they spent the night. Martha had a nightmare and was whimpering and of course her assistant came to get her foster mom and she calmed down when she was held. Martha likes to snuggle against her foster mom with Dutchess against her. The family gated off the bathroom for Martha so that she had a larger area to stay in while they are at work; Dutchess can hop the gate. The two became inseparable!

Like so many of our foster family, Dutchess’ family became “failed” fosters and adopted Martha. Having the ability to rescue animals such as Martha is why we do what we do. We are able to continue our rescue mission because of the support we receive throughout the year from our friends, sponsors and the community at large.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Since we do not have a permanent shelter, our biggest problem is having foster homes for our animals. We are limited in the animals we can take in due to the foster space we have available. Foster homes are vitally important to help in the care and socialization of our animals. SMAWL pays for the veterinary care and asks our foster families, in addition to providing a safe environment for them to live, to transport them to veterinary appointments and to adoption events so that they can find their “fur-ever” homes.

In addition, we do have many other volunteer opportunities such as working at our Rabies Clinics and Adoption Events. We also need assistance in caring for some of our cats who reside at the Petco in California, Md. and at our “Cat Castle” in Callaway, Md.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: We have Adoption Events at the Petco in California on Saturdays between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. and at our “Cat Castle” in Callaway on Saturdays and Sundays between 11:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. In addition, we have Rabies Clinics on the second Monday of the month between March and November at the St. Mary’s County Fairgrounds in Leonardtown, MD between 6:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. We also hold adoption events at other locations such as the PetValu in Leonardtown, the Tractor Supply Co in Hollywood and Pepper’s Pet Pantry in Solomon’s. In May we have our Annual Animal Fair, which is a fun-filled day for families and pets with many activities for everyone – one of the most popular of which is the “Woof-It Down” Contest (a “pie” eating contest where dogs and their humans compete).

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: There are several things people can do to get involved:

• Become a member – membership fees help us continue our mission. Membership fees are:

$35.00 – Individual

$50.00 – Family

$50.00 – Business

$250.00 – Lifetime

$500.00 – Business Lifetime

• Volunteer – there are many volunteer opportunities, from helping at an adoption event to helping to organize our Animal Fair.

• Foster – the more foster families we have, the more animals we can save!

• Have a pet food drive to help keep our Pet Food Pantry stocked.

Friday Focus: Christmas in April* Calvert County, Inc.

Christmas in April* Calvert County, Inc. In a true expression of neighbor helping neighbor, Christmas in April volunteers bring assistance to homeowners in need on their annual workday each spring. In 2013, the Calvert Count chapter of Christmas in April repaired a total of 34 homes, doing everything from cleaning gutters to roofing to landscaping. This week’s Friday Focus is a conversation with Bill Lloyd, President of Christmas in April*Calvert County, Inc.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: Christmas in April*Calvert County, Inc., a United Way partner started in Calvert County in 1991, is a nonprofit, volunteer organization that repairs and improves the homes of low-income homeowners. Low-income homeowners, especially the elderly, disabled and families with children, are eligible to apply for Christmas in April services.  All repairs are paid for by Christmas in April.  Homeowners are not expected to pay for any services provided. Once a home is referred, a home visit is made by the House Selection Committee.  The Board ultimately makes the difficult determination as to whether the house meets the eligibility criteria, is in need and can be repaired by Christmas in April in one day. Homeowners and family members who are present and who are able-bodied are expected to work alongside volunteers on the Christmas in April work day, which is the last Saturday in April every year.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: There are so many “moments” that happen on our workday. Just the look of happiness on homeowners’ faces on the workday is priceless. Imagine going five years without hot water, and then a group of strangers come to your home and not only fix your water heater but also landscape, remove trash and paint the inside of your house. I’m not sure who gets the most gratification, the homeowner or the volunteer. Our volunteers return every year!

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: We are always looking for more “house captains” that can lead a work crew in repairing the homes of our applicants. More donations are always welcome because we are a 100% volunteer organization, with all donations used to purchase supplies for the repairs of the homes. More donations would mean that we could repair more homes.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: Yes, our application period is fast approaching. We only review applications during September and October, choosing and visiting the homes in November and assembling work crews in December. Applications received after October will have to wait until the following September to be considered. Applications are available on our website, at the office of aging, at the library, and at most churches. Homeowners that are interested in having their home worked on should have their application in during that time. A lot of work will need to be done before the workday including meeting the homeowner, ordering supplies and assembling work crews. The “work day” is always the last Saturday in April. The Board of Directors works yearlong preparing for that one day. Over 800 volunteers work on up to 32 homes each year.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: People who are interested in making donations or volunteering to work with us on our work day can print or email the relevant form from our website www.christmasinaprilcalvertcounty.org.

Friday Focus: Loyola on the Potomac

This week’s Friday Focus takes us to Faulkner, Maryland, and the Loyola on the Potomac retreat house. Located on Beach photo with chair faded253 acres of scenic riverfront property, the retreat offers a quiet refuge for personal prayer and reflection for people of all faiths. We caught up with Jim Palmer, Director of the retreat house, who talked with us about how his organization impacts the lives of those it serves.

Q: Tell us about your organization. Who do you serve?

A: Loyola on the Potomac is a Retreat House (in the Roman Catholic tradition) that was founded by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and opened in 1958. Loyola is situated on a bluff overlooking the Potomac River. There are 235 acres of woodlands laced with numerous paths for all to enjoy. With its woods, riverfront beach and spectacular sunsets over the Potomac, Loyola has offered thousands of retreatants the opportunity and means of experiencing the joy and serenity of God’s presence.

The retreat house welcomes men and women of all faiths and backgrounds. Programs include Ignatian weekend retreats, mid-week retreats, private and directed retreats and personal days of prayer and reflection. Additionally, we collaborate with schools, social service agencies, volunteer organizations and other Church ministries to provide the opportunity for retreatants to come aside and rest awhile.

The Loyola experience affords our retreatants the opportunity to be conscious of God’s action in their lives and in the world, to deepen their faith, and to renew their commitment to justice.

Retreat programs sponsored by Loyola are conducted in the spirit of prayerful silence, inviting our guests to truly become aware of the presence of God in our world and in their lives. Our facility space is also utilized by local churches, social service organizations and schools who sponsor their own retreat programs.

The main house offers two chapels, comfortable lounges and sitting rooms and 70 individual bedrooms (each with a half bath). In addition, we have one large conference room and six small meeting rooms, a small fitness room, music room and bookstore. Internet access is available in our main retreat house.

Our property also houses Huckleberry House, a historic home that is used by visiting Jesuits and as an overflow space for larger retreats. We also have a lovely Hermitage on the property which features 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, a full kitchen, living room, prayer room and screened in porch. Our grounds feature well marked hiking trails and two outdoor Stations of the Cross pathways for prayer.

Loyola on the Potomac is also the home of St. Inigoes Youth Camp, an outdoor camping area equipped with a spacious bath/shower facility, two-story barn for group activities and worship, a dining pavilion, fire pit and amphitheater.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: At the end of our Ignatian Weekend Retreats we hold a session entitled “The Gathering of Graces” during which time the retreatants share what has happened in their lives during the course of their retreat. Every session becomes a favorite moment as I become aware of the amazing transformation retreatants experience by the grace of our loving God.

Another favorite moment that gets repeated several times throughout the year is the gratitude expressed by our retreatants who participate in our partnership retreats. Loyola is blessed to be able to partner with the Ignatian Spirituality Project to offer retreats for homeless men and women; Damien Ministries to provide retreats for men and women living with HIV/AIDS; and the San Miguel School, an independent Catholic middle school that provides education to disadvantaged Latino boys in Washington, D.C. It is often overwhelming to hear these retreatants, both young and old, express what their time at Loyola has meant in their lives.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Funding! Like most nonprofits, the fees we collect from our retreatants do not cover the cost of the services we offer. And so, we engage in fund raising campaigns and rely on our benefactors to keep our doors open and ensure that the work and ministry of the retreat house thrives.

Our main house is a large structure and is now more than 50 years old; the upkeep and renovations certainly bring many challenges to our staff, as well as take their toll on our budget.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

Crab Feast and Open House – September 7, 2014 from 2:00 – 5:00 at the Retreat House

Night of Honor Banquet & Auction – October 22, 2014 at 6:30 pm at the Greater Waldorf Jaycees

Christmas Saintly Tea – December 14, 2014 at 3:00 at the Retreat House

Loyola 5k River Run (and 1 mile walk) – June 20, 2015 at St. Inigoes Youth Camp

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: Individuals who would like to experience a retreat at Loyola can register on line at http://www.loyolaonthepotomac.com/

Groups and/or individuals that would like to do a community service or volunteer project on behalf of Loyola are invited to call our Development Director, Lisa White, at 301-392-0819.

Financial Donations to support our work and ministry can be made online or mailed directly to the retreat house. All donations made to Loyola on the Potomac are tax deductible to the full extend allowed by law.

Friday Focus: Rappahannock Goodwill Industries

Driven by a mission to provide opportunities and resources to those with barriers to employment, Rappahannock Goodwill Industries is an organizRGI Logoation that is making a difference in Fredericksburg and the surrounding counties! We caught up with Megan Bergen, Vice President, Mission Services for Goodwill, who chatted with us about Goodwill’s mission, shared some personal favorite moments and gave us a preview of the Goodwill Collaboration Zone: an exciting new space and vision for the organization.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: A Methodist minister named Edgar Helms founded Goodwill in 1902. More than a hundred years later, his vision of an “industrial program as well as a social service enterprise” lives on in 165 member agencies around the country that focus on the power and dignity of work. At Rappahannock Goodwill (a member agency), we serve the City of Fredericksburg and a 12-county region. We provide work opportunities and job training to people with barriers to employment, particularly those with disabilities. Operations include a commercial laundry, off-site custodial and administrative services, four Job Help Centers—and, of course, we operate twelve Goodwill stores, a Goodwill Outlet, and numerous Attended Donation Centers. In 2013, we served 3,898 people. 596 individuals were helped in our Job Help Centers, and 369 people were placed into jobs.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: At RGI, we celebrate the successes of our program participants—and we are in the lucky position of having lots of successes to celebrate. Daily, we support people in our Job Help Centers who have not been able to find jobs—a veteran transitioning to the civilian workforce, an ex-offender trying to get that much-needed second chance, or someone who has a disability that has gotten in the way. The greatest moment is when we are able to help that person find a job, so they can experience the power of work which leads to independence and a positive future.

Here’s a recent favorite moment: One of our current program participants—diagnosed in the fifth grade with an intellectual disability and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder—was referred to RGI after she graduated from high school in 2007. A previous vocational evaluation had indicated she demonstrated distractibility, inappropriate interpersonal interactions, negative and uncooperative attitude and a slow work pace. Evaluators asked that she participate in a community based assessment/training program to improve these behaviors before being accepted into their programming.

RGI filled this role and has proudly and successfully served her ever since, providing her with the necessary supports to grow both personally and vocationally. She has served as a valuable member of all work teams she has been assigned, and has transformed into a capable and confident young woman with endless potential. If that isn’t a great illustration of the power of work, I don’t know what is.

My recent favorite moment was finding out that starting next week, she will graduate from a high support program to a more independent position, working on an RGI mobile crew that does custodial jobs at another location.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Mission awareness has long been a fundamental challenge for Goodwill. Research conducted ten years ago found that while 90 percent of people surveyed know Goodwill, only 26 percent know the mission behind the donation centers and stores. This is an issue both nationally and locally—to our surprise, last year someone told us that our Job Help Centers (which provide free assistance to individuals looking to upgrade their job readiness and job search skills) were our best kept secret! We are working hard to increase mission awareness, to let people know that by donating and shopping they are creating jobs for people with barriers to employment. In our stores, we’ve begun asking shoppers if they wish to round up to support the mission—it’s another way to start a conversation with individuals in the community about how our stores help us put people to work. The tagline of a national ad campaign launched in 2013 says it all: “Donate Stuff. Create Jobs.”

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: In November, we will celebrate the opening of the Goodwill Collaboration Zone: nearly 10,000 square feet of space set aside to be rented by nonprofits whose visions align with ours. Co-location of RGI staff and the staffs of other agencies will facilitate working together to better serve the people we all serve. The vision is that this collaborative environment will allow us all to help people with a variety of barriers reach their full potential, both on and off the job.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: We are always seeking volunteers to help us further our mission! We have many volunteer positions, from Goodwill mentor (working one-on-one with a particular person in the Job Help Center to achieve certain goals) to literacy tutor to Goodwill ambassador (increasing the general public’s awareness of RGI and its services). We even offer a virtual career volunteer opportunity to accommodate volunteers who are unable to be physically present during Job Help Center hours. People interested in volunteering should visit our website (www.fredgoodwill.org) for details.

Community Bank of the Chesapeake is proud to support Rappahannock Goodwill Industries through its annual Casual for a Cause program. If you would like to donate to Goodwill directly, visit their website at http://www.fredgoodwill.org/donate.

Friday Focus: Calvert Library Foundation

For thousands of years, libraries have been a staple community institution where people could gather and seek out information. Today, the Calvert County Librarcalvert_library_logoy system continues the tradition, providing central hubs that provide not only books, but an endless list of programs and services as well. This week’s Friday Focus organization, the Calvert Library Foundation, plays a vital role in supporting the Library’s mission by providing additional funding. We spoke with Scott Deacon, Vice President of the Foundation’s Board of Directors, who shared his thoughts on the many ways the Library benefits the local community.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: Calvert Library Foundation is an enabling organization whose stated purpose is to improve public library services and facilities in Calvert County, Maryland.  The Foundation accomplishes this purpose by securing non-government funding from residents of Calvert County and its surrounding counties in Maryland, businesses and private sources.  These funds are used to purchase resources that will make significant improvements to libraries and their programs not otherwise obtainable through governmental or other institutional funding.  In 2013, the Foundation provided needed funds to the Library for furnishings and for staff training to improve services for County residents. We also conducted a capital campaign and provided more than $225,000 for the outfitting of one branch.  Funds provided by the Foundation help bridge the difference between the Calvert Library being good and being GREAT!

The Calvert Library is comprised of four separate branches throughout Calvert County, Maryland.  In 2013, the library was able to provide the more than 88,500 county residents and residents of nearby counties with a complete range of library services and employed 54 full-time equivalent employees.  They served nearly 600,000 customers in-person, circulated the 265,864 items in their physical collection 1,121,505 times and answered more than 145,954 reference questions.  Their website saw 186,465 unique visitors and the webpage was viewed 904,867 times.  The computers were used 141,507 times.  Additionally, outside groups used the meeting rooms 3,471 times.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: I do not think I have just one “moment”.  Actually, every time I go into one of the library facilities I get a sense of satisfaction.  You can almost feel the wonderment of those who are gaining from all the library has to offer.  When I grew up, we lived in an area that was so rural we did not have a library facility.  Rather, we had an old bus that served as a mobile library and brought books to our area once a week.  So when I go into the library facilities, I look at all the patrons who are benefitting from its very presence and I appreciate all of those who made and continue to make that reality.  For example, the Foundation provided a large flat-screen television in the meeting room which has become a mainstay for presentations, workshops, the cinema café movie nights, and is used extensively by community organizations on a daily basis.  Also, the circulating video games the foundation provided are very popular.  Finally, the Foundation has provided for children’s activity cubes, additional computers for patrons and staff, comfortable library furnishings and foreign language CDs and DVDs.

Q: Why is the Library important?

A: Calvert Library is a hub for members of our community to connect and interact across all demographic groups. The Library hosts a range of activities and social programs that engage our minds and provide opportunities to exchange ideas with other people.  It has numerous partnering agencies (College of Southern Maryland, public schools, Head Start, Workforce Investment Board’s Mobile Job Center, etc.) where its programs complement and reinforce theirs.  The library provides opportunities to bring diverse segments of the population together to have civil discourse about matters of importance.  Their “Choose Civility” programming is just one of many the library offers to address needs in our community.

It is also an important economic equalizer, providing equal access to technology, information and lifelong learning opportunities to all who wish to develop both professionally and personally.  It is a meeting place for those seeking to improve their English-speaking skills. Students and job seekers flock to the library to use computers for schoolwork, research, job searches and many other things.

It also makes green sense (environmental, not just dollars) to have reference materials, databases, literature and media in one place for people to access. Having hard copies to share across a community and online copies of documents shared by thousands of people in our county saves trees from being harvested and waters from being polluted. The Library provides timely, accurate responses to questions.  Its inter-library loan system connects people to the information they seek – all these services are provided free of charge to everyone.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Managing technology.  We need to assist the library in staying relevant to their patrons, young and old alike.  We also need to help the library stay abreast of the emerging technology as it relates to providing access to entertainment and knowledge.  There is a move toward having Maker-spaces in libraries where computers are programmed to manufacture 3D items. By providing cutting edge equipment such as this, the Library helps to ignite people’s imagination and foster the science, technology, engineering and math skills that make America competitive.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: Coming up on October 25 is the Foundation’s 2014 Gala Art Auction. This is the second year for the event. Last year’s auction was a great success and raised over $10,000 for the Foundation.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: Please visit our website at http://calvertlibraryfoundation.com and look for activities and opportunities to join the foundation in its endeavors.  I should point out that the Calvert Library Foundation is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization and as such, your contribution is tax–deductible to the extent allowed by law.  Please contact us if you would like to become a member of the Library Foundation Board or if you would like to assist and/or participate in any of the Foundation events.  Finally, there are few—if any—institutions that provide so many free services and programs for people. Your donation will help this great institution innovate and reach out to all segments of the population. Your dollars will enable people to achieve their potential. And, you will know that you are an important part of something larger than yourself.

Community Bank is proud to support the Calvert Library Foundation through our annual “Casual for a Cause” campaign. If you’d like to donate directly to the Foundation, please visit their website.

Friday Focus: Southern Maryland Mission of Mercy

The Southern Maryland Mission of Mercy is part of a national initiative to improve the dental health of those without insurance by holding free two-day dental clinics. The clinics provide services ranging from preventative dentistry and cleanings to restorative fillings and extractions. The last clinic held in Southern Maryland took place in June 2012 at Chopticon High School. Led by Dr. Garner Morgan and a team of local dental professionals and volunteers, the organization was able to provide dental services to around 900 people. We caught up with Jean Wathen, a representative from the organization, who gave us more information on the next free clinic, scheduled for July 18 and 19 of this year!

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: Southern Maryland Mission of Mercy is a free adult dental clinic provided by volunteer dental professionals and volunteer staff of several hundred people. Dental services for adult patients include:

• Preventive dentistry and cleaning
• Nutritional counseling
• Restorative fillings
• Extractions

All dental services are provided by licensed dentists and hygienists, mostly from Maryland. Mission of Mercy was launched by Virginia Dental Health Foundation in 2000. Over 50 MOM projects are hosted in Virginia, and are now spreading elsewhere.

The first local MOM for Maryland’s Charles, St. Mary’s, and Calvert Counties was held in June 2012 at Chopticon High School in St. Mary’s County.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: Seeing people smile for the first time in a very long time. When you are not ashamed of your teeth, you have much more self-esteem in life.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Our biggest challenge is fundraising; the cost is $80,000 to $100,000 for the two-day clinic.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: The next Southern Maryland Mission of Mercy (SMMOM) will be held on July 18th and 19th at North Point High School in Charles County.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: This clinic is made possible by volunteers. Upwards of 400 community volunteers are needed as well as 200 dentists, dental assistants, hygienists, oral surgeons, physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses and dental students.

Community volunteers do not need any special dental or medical training in order to participate. We need help with security, parking, volunteer and patient registration, meals, escorting, and more. Please register to volunteer online.

Community Bank of the Chesapeake proudly supports Southern Maryland Mission of Mercy through our annual Casual for a Cause Program!

Friday Focus: The Community Foundation of Rappahannock River Region

Since 1997, the Community Foundation of Rappahannock has supported local organizations through its philanthropic efforts. Working with individual donors and corporations alike, the Foundation creates endowments, grants and scholarships that benefit a number of programs, groups and community-oriented charitable efforts throughout Fredericksburg and the surrounding counties.  Our Friday Focus interviewee this week is the Foundation’s Executive Director, Teri McNally, who shared with us the challenges and rewards of grant-making!

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: The Community Foundation is a private, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that has been managing charitable giving on behalf of generous local individuals, families and businesses since 1997. We establish named charitable funds and invest and manage charitable assets for the benefit of the entire Rappahannock River region, which includes the City of Fredericksburg and the four surrounding counties of Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: I’m happiest at work when I am talking to area donors about what they believe in, what they are grateful for and how they want to give back. And I love it when we get to “connect the dots” between generous donors and the nonprofit organizations who are working hard each day to meet our community’s needs – whether that be through environmental conservation, arts, education, health and wellness, etc.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: They biggest challenge is that there are so many nonprofits doing such great work, but a limited amount of grant funding to distribute. It can be hard to say no when multiple nonprofits are competing for a grant. But it has an upside, too, because it pushes us to look for the most efficient, strategic and well-planned projects to benefit from our donor’s giving.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: We will be hosting a continuing education opportunity for area professional advisors, such as investment bankers, estate attorneys, and accountants. This low cost, high value training will be held on September 16. Our website–www.cfrrr.org—will have more information and registration opportunities as the event draws closer.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: When the time comes in life to give back to a community that gives so much to each of us, I hope everyone will remember the local foundation that can help.

Opening a charitable fund at the Community Foundation is easy. A phone call is a great way to start! Teri McNally, Executive Director: 540 373-9292 or email terrimcnally@cfrrr.org.

Friday Focus: Charles County Dive Rescue, Inc.

When disaster strikes on the water, Charles County Dive Rescue, Inc. (CCDR) is there to help by dispatching properly trained and equipped divers to assist in emergencies. The organization was founded in 1989, when medical advances in near-drowning resuscitation prompted a need for a specialized rescue team that could respond in those situations. Today, CCDR Company 13 is an independent emergency service agency that operates an in-house training program and maintains a fleet of dive and rescue boats and vehicles. We talked with Chief William “Skeeter” Porter for this week’s Friday Focus, who gave us an inside look into the organization.design4_01

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: CCDR is an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization that operates with other public safety agencies for emergencies around water and ice. Our mission is to serve the citizens of Charles County (as well as neighboring jurisdictions) by providing properly trained and equipped divers to assist in times of need. Further, we shall always strive to raise public conscience concerning safety around water and ice.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: It’s hard to pick a ‘favorite’ moment when your service is most needed at times when people may be experiencing a horrible tragedy. Suffice it to say, we are fortunate to have dedicated members who volunteer their time, knowledge and skills to help others in their time of need.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Many emergency operations on open water are difficult due to a lack of reliable information. Distance is very hard to estimate over water. Also, wind and currents create difficult contributing factors. Alcohol is often a contributing factor to accidents, which also makes obtaining accurate information about an incident difficult.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: Our 26th Annual “Vampire Manor” fundraiser starts in October. The Manor is run by our team members and all profits go to support CCDR, the Bel Alton VFD and some of the local high schools who help provide the volunteer creatures. Check out the website at www.vampiremanor.com/ for more information.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: You can learn more about CCDR by visiting our website at www.ccdr.net.

Community Bank is proud to support Charles County Dive Rescue through our annual “Casual for a Cause” campaign. If you’d like to donate directly to CCDR, donations can be mailed to: Charles County Dive and Rescue, Inc. P.O. Box 13, Pomfret, MD 20675.

Friday Focus: The Center for Life Enrichment

In 1963, the Center for Life Enrichment was founded in Leonardtown Maryland and has worked to positively impact the lives of people with intellectual disalogobilities in Southern Maryland ever since. The Center provides programs and services to help individuals increase independence, integrate into the workforce and have opportunities for social interaction. The Center is currently making the final preparations for its annual “Cash Bash” event this weekend, and Executive Director Randy Ferguson took time out of his busy schedule to chat with us for this week’s Friday Focus.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.).

A: The Center for Life Enrichment (TCLE) is a nonprofit organization that provides services to individuals with special needs in St. Mary’s, Calvert and Charles counties. The type of services that we provide are aligned with our mission statement: “to provide programs and support services that will increase the vocational and personal potential of individuals with disabilities”. We are currently providing support to nearly 250 individuals throughout the three counties. TCLE provides a variety of services, grouped according to an individual’s interest and needs: day supports, vocational training, community employment, in-home supports, transportation and community integration. To learn more about our organization, please visit our website at http://www.tcle.org.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: If you ask anyone who works in this field what their favorite moment would be, more than likely their response would be “Every day is special and the biggest reward is the smiles that we receive”. We have a number of individual success stories from individuals receiving their first job, their first paycheck, to individuals getting their own apartment. For TCLE, the favorite moments are all individualized.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: All nonprofit organizations will tell you that their biggest challenge is maintaining or raising money for their organization. The biggest challenge facing many nonprofits is to remain fiscally strong and sound and at the same time, be able to provide the necessary services needed by those we serve.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: We have a few events on our calendar. On May 17, TLCE will be holding our fourth annual Cash Bash at the Hollywood Fire House from noon to five, with tickets available at the door. We also have a golf tournament scheduled on September 26, 2014 at the Wicomico Golf Course.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: We have a number of ways individuals can become involved at the Center for Life Enrichment:
• We have a volunteer program where individuals can volunteer their time working directly with the participants or assisting us at fundraising events.
• We are always looking for the community’s support by accepting donations of clothes, toys, furniture and everyday knick-knacks that will support our four Vintage Values Thrift Stores.
• We have a boat and car donation program
• We are a United Way Recipient; our campaign number is #56384
• We accept monetary donations to support special projects

Individuals wishing to help or if they would like more information can contact us at 301-373-8100 or email us at contact@tcle.org.