Friday Focus: Anathoth House

As the cold winter months approach, organizations like Anathoth House, Inc. banathoth houseecome especially important to the community. This all-volunteer initiative reaches out to individuals in need to provide sustenance, support and spiritual guidance. We spoke with Tracey Alston, a representative of Anathoth House, who shared a little more about the organization’s mission.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: Anathoth House, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. We provide meals, clothing, survival kits and emergency food packages to the homeless, needy and other persons in crisis. We combine our efforts with local agencies and churches in the hope of promoting the self-sufficiency of those we serve.

Along with physical restoration, we purpose to bring about spiritual renewal to those we come in contact with through prayer and ministering the written Gospel. Assisting others through physical means is beneficial, but we know that to be only a short-term solution. The true bread of life is the continuous application of the Word of God; as it is long lasting and a key ingredient needed to transform lives from brokenness to victorious living. Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. Our organization has no paid staff and all donations go towards those in need.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A:  I have two. The first is when we were delivering food to a senior who lives on very little income. She was very grateful for the holiday basket of food that was given to her. After giving her the food, our volunteers spent time talking and praying with her. The senior then asked if she could go with them to church, as she recognized she needed spiritual food more than natural food. She said that was needed most. So our volunteers picked her up and brought her to church the following Sunday.

My second favorite moment was when I learned one of the women who was living out in tents in the woods, had landed work. To date, she is still working and living in a studio apartment. She is facing health challenges, but she is out of the woods.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: The biggest challenge is attaining the opportunity where we can sit down and gather with those we serve. Our goal is to establish an ongoing relationship with them to prove ourselves trustworthy. As we go about accomplishing that, we slowly teach them basic fundamental skills that so many of us take for granted. Many we serve are victims of circumstances and/or have not been taught basic life skills.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: We have our holiday food giveaways and in 2015, we hope to resume our workshops, where we invite the women we serve. We have an awesome time of fellowship where we minister the Word of God and have brunch.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization? 

A:  They can reach us through our website, AnathothHouse.org, or call us at 301.751.4870. We have many people who want to volunteer. We like to first meet those interested in helping first; there is also an application and, depending on the project, we do background checks.

Friday Focus: Windows of Strength

Undergoing an organ transplant can be a lengthy ordeal for both the recipient and his or her family. This week’s Friday Focus organization, Windows of Strength, Limited, seeks to relieve some of the financial stress for transplant recipients and their caregivers. We caught up with founder, Sandy Walker-Samler, who shared more information about the positive impact her organization has had on the lives of those in need.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.) 

A: Windows of Strength is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization assisting organ transplant recipients and their caregivers with non-medical costs that are not covered by insurance, government programs or other organizations during their transplant process. These costs include transportation to and from follow-up doctor visits and testing, lodging for caregivers and family members during the recipient’s hospital stay, meals and other needs that may arise that do not fall under medical classification.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)? 

A: We have helped organ transplant recipients and their caregivers in many ways. Each time we provide assistance is considered a special moment. There is such a need for this type of support; we wish we could help more. We have aided in areas such as:

  • Providing gas cards for transportation needs to allow recipients to travel back and forth to their follow-up doctor appointments and tests.
  • Providing assistance with lodging and bus transportation for recipients who live out of their transplant clinic area when they must follow-up with doctor appointments and tests after their transplant surgery.
  • Helping to pay for parking fees for the recipients while at their doctor appointments and follow-up tests.
  • Helping with phone and utility bills, homeowner’s and car insurance for recipients in need of assistance due to their caregiver and/or themselves being unable to work after their transplant surgery.
  • Paying rent for the recipients in need of assistance due to the caregiver and/or recipient being on an unpaid leave of absence.
  • Donating to the Gift of Life Family House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Gift of Life Family House serves as a “home away from home” for transplant patients and their families by providing temporary, affordable lodging and supportive services to those who travel to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for transplant-related care.

These are the main areas where we have helped; however, there have been other miscellaneous requests that we have granted funding to help with financial assistance

Q: What is your biggest challenge? 

A:   Awareness, Funding, and Volunteers.

Windows of Strength was formed in 2010 and received 501(c)(3) status in 2011. Being a newly formed organization, we are faced with the challenge of growing awareness about the organization and our mission.   We started from the ground up and do not have any statewide chapters or a national umbrella that we fall under to assist with awareness or funding. We are not a “known” name throughout the community. Most of our funding comes from two major events we hold each year: a Mother/Daughter Tea and Fashion Show held the Sunday before Mother’s Day and a Holiday Gift Show held the Sunday before Thanksgiving. We have also held smaller fundraising events throughout the year which has helped in these areas.

In addition, most of the transplant clinics are located in the Baltimore and D.C. areas where there is a larger transplant community to draw from. Here in Southern Maryland, we don’t have transplant centers. Though there are many organ transplant recipients in the area, due to confidentiality and the sensitive nature of a transplant, we do not have the access as the larger organizations do to reach out to this community. With that being said, it has also been a big challenge to find volunteers in the Southern Maryland area to assist with the organization. We know the people are out there, but just need help in finding ways to connect to them.

We continue to make baby steps, however we are excited to report that this year we made huge progress in establishing great partnerships with transplant social workers from the Johns Hopkins Transplant Center and the University of Maryland Transplant Center. In order to verify a recipient’s need for assistance, a grant application must be submitted and signed off by their transplant social worker before submitting to Windows of Strength for funding. We have been able to provide assistance to many of the recipients from these centers, some of which are from the Southern Maryland area. 

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: Yes. Our Annual Holiday Gift Show – Sunday, November 23, 2014 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the North Beach Volunteer Fire Department, North Beach, Md.

We also sell very delicious tea and tasty creamed honey over the holidays. They can be purchased individually or in gift sets and baskets.

Other ongoing fund raising events:

  1. When you shop online at AmazonSmile and choose Windows of Strength as your charity organization, Amazon will donate a percentage to Windows of Strength.
  2. If you like jewelry, check out www.bravelets.com and search for Windows of Strength as your charity.   Bravelets™ will donate $10 from each jewelry purchase to Windows of Strength.
  3. We have partnered with Phoneraiser.com in collecting used/old cell phones and ink jet cartridges. The donation of these items help Windows of Strength raise money for organ transplant recipients and their caregivers, while at the same time protecting the environment by giving old technology new life and keeping it from polluting our landfills. The unwanted cell phones and ink cartridges are recycled in accordance with EPA regulations or refurbished and reused.     

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?  

A: Contact Windows of Strength by phone at 443-951-5125; email at mywish@windowsofstrength.org; or find more information online at www.windowsofstrength.org. Windows of Strength can also be found on Facebook and Pinterest. Our mailing address is P.O. Box 584, Chesapeake Beach, MD 20732.

Holiday Food and Toy Drive November 12-December 12

You can help us make a difference and brighten up the holiday season for those in need.Holiday Food & Toy Drive

We’re proud to announce the start of our Fourth Annual Food and Toy Drive. Each year it brings us great pleasure to bring back this special seasonal event to help support the organizations and individuals in our communities.

Helping others during the holidays

You can drop off non-perishable food goods, such as canned vegetables and fruit, soups, baby formula, powdered milk, peanut butter and hot/cold cereals, at any Community Bank branch between November 12 and December 12.

Collections made in Southern Maryland will be donated to the Southern Maryland Food Bank, collections in King George County will be donated to the Department of Social Services for the King George Food Pantry and collections in Fredericksburg will be donated to the Fredericksburg Area Food Bank.

We are also collecting new, unwrapped toys to distribute to local families with young children during the holidays. Toys collected will support the Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots program.

Friday Focus: Humane Society of Calvert County

Helping stray animals find permanent, loving homes is the mission of this wecalvert humane societyek’s Friday Focus organization. The Humane Society of Calvert County works to place animals in responsible homes, increase awareness through education and outreach, reduce animal overpopulation and eliminate cruelty. They serve as an advocate for animals by promoting humane standards, and seek to enhance the relationship between animals and people. This week, we spoke with the Society’s Kirstyn Northrop Cobb, who talked with us about her organization’s work.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: The Humane Society of Calvert County is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization specializing in placing homeless animals into loving homes throughout Southern Maryland.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: A few years back, we brought in a very thin dog. He had been left chained out in the back of an abandoned home. He was thin, malnourished, hairless and had obviously lost hope. We brought him into our organization, fattened him up, made him healthy again and found him an amazing home. This is a story that repeats itself all the time within our organization and each and every time, it is special to us, but this guy really stood out as he was one of the first that I took part in.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Our biggest challenge, by far, is the constant frustration that there are still so many animals in need of homes and we are unable to take them in due to space limitations. We look forward to a day when there are no more homeless pets.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: We have many upcoming events! Our annual Rock ‘N Roll for Rescue is coming up. We have “Home for the Holidays” in December and November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization? 

A: We have many volunteer opportunities available. We are always in need of volunteers to walk dogs or help at events. We welcome visitors and, as always, the number one way to help is to adopt a pet!

Friday Focus: American Red Cross Rappahannock Area

redcross-logoThis week’s Friday Focus organization is part of the world’s largest volunteer network. Active in 187 countries worldwide, the Red Cross plays a fundamental role in the lives of many millions of people. We spoke with Jonathan McNamara, Regional Director of Donor and Media Relations and spokesman for the local Virginia chapter of the organization, about the important role the Red Cross plays locally, nationally and globally.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: The American Red Cross exists to provide compassionate care to those in need. Our network of generous donors, volunteers and employees shares a mission of preventing and relieving suffering, here at home and around the world, through five key service areas:

Disaster Relief: The Red Cross responds to approximately 70,000 disasters in the United States every year, ranging from home fires that affect a single family to hurricanes that affect tens of thousands, to earthquakes that impact millions. In these events, the Red Cross provides shelter, food, health and mental health services to help families and entire communities get back on their feet. Although the Red Cross is not a government agency, it is an essential part of the response when disaster strikes. We work in partnership with other agencies and organizations that provide services to disaster victims.

Supporting America’s Military Families: The Red Cross helps military members, veterans and their families prepare for, cope with and respond to the challenges of military service. Emergency communications, training, support to wounded warriors and veterans, and access to community resources help an average of 150,000 military families and veterans annually.

Live-saving Blood: Your donations of blood are what make the American Red Cross the largest single supplier of blood and blood products in the U.S. Each year, nearly 4 million people donate blood through the Red Cross, helping to provide more than 40% of America’s blood supply.

Health and Safety Services: The Red Cross is the nation’s leading provider of health and safety courses, such as CPR, First Aid and Lifeguard training. Each year, more than 9 million Americans participate in our training programs, including first responders, educators, babysitters and people who want to be prepared to help others in an emergency.

International Services: The American Red Cross is part of the world’s largest humanitarian network with 13 million volunteers in 187 countries. Working together, we help respond to disasters, build safer communities, and teach the rules of war. Each year, we reach an average of more than 100 million people across the globe. 

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: Every moment where we help a family is special. From supporting families who have lost everything after a home fire at 3:00 a.m., to reuniting a loved ones seperated by armed conflict, our volunteers and staff work tirelessly to alleviate human suffering.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: We continue to have to adapt to the challenges our communites face. This is why we work so hard to recruit and train volunteers to support our mission. We also work with a variety of partners to commmunicate our vision and work to bring people together to build more prepared and resilient communities.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: We are participating in a variety of community events across our area. For more information about upcoming events, or to have the Red Cross at your next function, visit http://www.redcross.org/va/fredericksburg or call 757-446-7700. You can also follow the Red Cross on Twitter @RCCoastalVA or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/redcrossSEVA.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization? 

A: Each year, over one million Americans serve as Red Cross volunteers providing local community needs, such as:

  • Helping people in emergencies and disaster response
  • Teaching people how to prevent, prepare for and respond to emergencies
  • Teaching first aid and CPR, swimming and other health and safety skills
  • Delivering emergency messages to members of the military
  • Reconnecting families separated around the world through international tracking services, etc.
  • Organizing youth programs

Red Cross volunteers work directly with people, serve on boards of directors, serve as managers, advisors, and provide behind the scenes support. Be a Red Cross volunteer!

Helping others feels good, and helps you feel good about yourself. Your local Red Cross can work with you to provide rewarding experiences, opportunities to utilize your talents, or provide training to help you serve your community.

To join our team visit: http://www.redcross.org/va/fredericksburg/volunteer

Halloween Safety Tips

The candy bowls are full, the Jack-o-Lanterns are carved and your children have been wearing their costumes around the house in anticipation. However, before your children take to the neighborhood on October 31, it’s important you proceed with the proper safety precautions to ensure everyone has a great time while scaring up some fun. Here are a few helpful Halloween safety tips for both parents and chPumpkinsildren alike.

Costume Caution

As much as possible, encourage bright or light colored costumes. However, if your children like to take the scare factor to a whole new level by donning costumes fit for a horror movie set, there are ways to make even the most frightening frocks safer. While it might be difficult to convince your son of the need to brighten up his Batman costume for fear of “totally ruining it,” try adding reflective or glow-in-the-dark tape to the bottom of dark costumes and candy bags. Carrying flashlights and glow sticks can also make dark costumes more visible to drivers while not taking too much away from the costume.

‘One size fits all’ might work for the manufacturer, but such store-bought costumes are often far from that. Make sure your child tries on the costume with whatever footwear they intend to pair it with. Pay special attention to the costume’s length, and make sure it is the right size, as a costume that is too long could more easily result in trips and falls.

Masks can make it difficult to see and can hamper your child’s peripheral vision. Nontoxic face paint or make-up are better options, but start by testing a small amount your child’s arm beforehand to check for any possible reaction.

Safekids.org recommends that children under the age of 12 be accompanied by an adult. While chaperoning the group’s movement from house to house, make certain everyone remains on the sidewalks at all times and cross the street at crosswalks whenever possible. If a street does not have a sidewalk, always walk along the left side watching forward for any oncoming cars.

And if you’re children are old enough to venture out on their own, it’s best to remind them of these trick-or-treating rules. It is also a good idea to have them carry a fully charged cellphone and stick to familiar, well-lit neighborhoods.

Drivers, remember the popular trick-or-treating times are between 5:30 and 9:30 pm. Proceed with caution and keep an eye out for children, especially in neighborhoods, when out on the roads.

Rules of the Road

Safekids.org recommends that children under the age of 12 be accompanied by an adult. While chaperoning the group’s movement from house to house, make certain everyone remains on the sidewalks at all times and cross the street at crosswalks whenever possible. If a street does not have a sidewalk, always walk along the left side watching forward for any oncoming cars.

And if you’re children are old enough to venture out on their own, it’s best to remind them of these trick-or-treating rules. It is also a good idea to have them carry a fully charged cellphone and stick to familiar, well-lit neighborhoods.

Drivers, remember the popular trick-or-treating times are between 5:30 and 9:30 pm. Proceed with caution and keep an eye out for children, especially in neighborhoods, when out on the roads.

Candy Collecting

The Food and Drug Administration suggests giving your children a light meal before heading out. This can help prevent hunger, and cut down on the temptation to snack while trick-or-treating. This is especially helpful for parents as it provides you an opportunity to inspect your children’s candy after getting back home.

When checking your child’s candy collection, be on the lookout for homemade goods and any suspicious wrapping. A good rule of thumb is to stick with only candy or sweets found in commercially wrapped packaging.

Whether you will be out trick-or-treating with your children or on your way home from work, just remember to keep these safety tips in mind on Halloween night. We hope everyone has a safe and very Happy Halloween!

Friday Focus: The Calvert Nature Society

This week’s Friday Focus organization invites people to take a break frKLPom the hectic buzz of the technological world and escape to the natural landscape of Calvert County. Working with the local Division of Natural Resources, The Calvert Nature Society (previously known as the Battle Creek Nature Education Society) provides opportunities for appreciation and understanding of the natural world through various outreach initiatives. We caught up with Anne Sundermann, the Society’s Executive Director for this week’s interview.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: Battle Creek Nature Education Society was formed in the late 1980s to support the Calvert County nature parks: Battle Creek Cypress Swamp, Flag Ponds Nature Park, Kings Landing Park, Biscoe Gray Heritage Farm and other natural areas in the county. The Society works in partnership with the County’s Division of Natural Resources to offer nature programs to residents and park visitors. We also support the preservation of the Calvert County’s natural heritage, work to protect lands in the county, highlight the importance of our natural resources, and promote environmentally aware and literate communities.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: The Society has a long tradition of supporting the county in its effort to improve and expand the nature parks in the County. Right now, Calvert County has provided the Society with a grant to rebuild the Fisherman’s Shanty at Flag Ponds. The Flag Ponds fisherman’s shanty is a reminder of the thriving commercial fisheries that were a main component of the economies of our bayside towns. The shanties were in use from the early 1900s until the mid to late 1950s.

The Flag Ponds shanty was destroyed in an act of arson during Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. So many people in Calvert responded to our plea for donations of both financial support and for period items to refurnish the shanty. Work will start soon on the new building and we are very excited to be able to have such a large part in bringing this piece of Calvert history back to life.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Time. Our hectic schedules leave little room for downtime and often a walk in the woods gets put on the back burner in the rush to complete errands or catch up on chores. And there are so many distractions, with the constant interruptions from electronic media. As people spend more time online, they can become disconnected from the “IRL” (in real life) opportunities around them. BCNES/Calvert Nature Society strives to re-connect individuals to the natural world. We already provide programs for pre-school to adult, but we want to provide more programming that will catch the interest of middle and high schoolers.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: We have a full calendar of fall and winter events, including our volunteer events. We have a lot of fun events scheduled for late October/early November. The Nature Photography Mini Camp connects art and nature on October 27. Our Barn Owl Workday is scheduled for Friday, November 7. Calvert Stewards are planting holly trees at the Cypress Swamp on November 1. And there is a dog walk at our newest park, Biscoe Gray Heritage Farm, also on November 1. Most events are free for Society members. See the full calendar at www.calvertparks.org/calendar.html.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: Assisting at the Calvert County nature parks is a rewarding way to raise awareness of the importance of our natural lands. Natural Resources staff develops programs that present a continuing stream of environmental action activities at the county nature parks for children, families, and adults.

Our volunteers teach school children the ChesPax curriculum, they plant trees and butterfly gardens, they walk the trails, help monitor wildlife, and in general, provide stewardship for our nature parks. Our Junior Ranger Corps engages youth, ages 12-16 in park projects and teaches outdoor and leadership skills. Calvert Stewards tackles trail maintenance and other park projects.

Our volunteers come from all walks of life and have many different interests, but all use their experience to help preserve the natural heritage of Calvert County. Volunteer opportunities are listed at www.calvertparks.org/volunteer.html

Is email marketing right for your business?

Today, nearly everyone has an email account. And, if you’re in business, n370001Bearly everyone could be your target market. Put the two together, and all your problems are solved, right?

The answer is “maybe,” if you do it right.

The broad definition of email marketing is the promotion of products or services via email. You communicate with current customers with their permission, or by “cold calling” potential customers from a purchased list. Your goal is to get them to buy something, buy more of something, or just stay loyal to your brand.

But, once you hit “Send,” you’re no longer in control. The email recipient could choose not to open your email, delete it, or decide to opt out. Maybe it ended up in the Spam pile. And, if the email IS opened, the timing could be off.

You have to reach your targets when they are ready to act, not when you are. It stands to reason, then, that holiday-related emails might draw a higher response than one you send in the middle of March.

And, speaking of timing, are you over-emailing? Are you bombarding digital inboxes with emails that are now the equivalent of paper “junk mail”? Worse still, are you in danger of violating the government’s SPAM act?

How should you approach email marketing? Take a look at what this digital marketing company spokesman considers 5 Brands That Get Email Marketing Right, from Amazon to Moosejaw Mountaineering!

Are you currently email marketing, but with limited success? Entrepreneur.com offers tips on How to Create an E-Mail Marketing Campaign That People Will Notice.

And, last but not least, comes this warning, when it comes to emails in general: Never substitute emails for good, old-fashioned common business sense, ever! Don’t send that email, pick up the phone.

Do you have an email newsletter for your business?

7 Tips for Protecting Yourself Online

Though the internet has many advantages, it can also make users vulneSecurity Button On Keyboardrable to fraud, identity theft and other scams. According to a Norton Cybercrime Report, 556 million adults worldwide were victims of cybercrime in 2012. The American Bankers Association recommends the following tips to keep you safe online:

1. Keep your computers and mobile devices up to date. Having the latest security software, web browser, and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.

2. Set strong passwords. A strong password is at least eight characters in length and includes a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers, and special characters.

3. Watch out for phishing scams. Phishing scams use fraudulent emails and websites to trick users into disclosing private account or login information. Do not click on links or open any attachments or pop-up screens from sources you are not familiar with.

  • Forward phishing emails to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at spam@uce.gov – and to the company, bank, or organization impersonated in the email.

4. Keep personal information personal. Hackers can use social media profiles to figure out your passwords and answer those security questions in the password reset tools. Lock down your privacy settings and avoid posting things like birthdays, addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc. Be wary of requests to connect from people you do not know.

5. Secure your internet connection. Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.

6. Shop safely. Before shopping online, make sure the website uses secure technology. When you are at the checkout screen, verify that the web address begins with https. Also, check to see if a tiny locked padlock symbol appears on the page.

7. Read the site’s privacy policies. Though long and complex, privacy policies tell you how the site protects the personal information it collects. If you don’t see or understand a site’s privacy policy, consider doing business elsewhere.

Friday Focus: Point Lookout Lighthouse Preservation Society

Photo credit: Lisa Kane

Photo credit: Lisa Kane

At the southernmost tip of St. Mary’s County is the Point Lookout Lighthouse, a historical landmark that has stood since 1830. Today, the preservation and maintenance of the lighthouse is managed in part by the Point Lookout Lighthouse Preservation Society, Inc., a nonprofit foundation started in 2006. As the organization prepares to host its annual “Feel the History 5k” race this weekend, we spoke with Chuck Kohls, Treasurer and Volunteer Coordinator for the Society.

Q: Tell us about your organization (who you serve, what you do, etc.)

A: We were founded to assist in the preservation of the Point Lookout Lighthouse when it was transferred from United States Navy ownership to the state of Maryland. Unfortunately, the state park did not have funding to maintain, let alone restore, the historic structure in Point Lookout State Part at the confluence of the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay in St. Mary’s County.

We hold open houses so visitors can see and learn about this landmark. We also give special tours to groups of interested persons. In addition, we hold ‘preservation workdays’ when our volunteers meet to do a variety of tasks such as cleaning the house, painting, yard maintenance and repairs needed to prevent further deterioration. We also hold fundraising events and have a small gift shop open during open houses to raise funds for the restoration of the lighthouse. Since the lighthouse is considered haunted by many authorities on the subject we also hold ‘Paranormal Investigation’ nights, where individuals and groups have several hours of nighttime access to conduct their own investigations. These are very popular and have proven to be a good fundraiser.

Q: What is your favorite “moment” (example of how your organization helped)?

A: It sounds so simple but we were able to raise the necessary funds to purchase and install a new flagpole to replace the 50 plus year old wooden pole that was rotting and becoming unsafe. Just seeing the flags fly when we are open brings a big smile to my face.

But, I think our most rewarding moments are when we talk with of visitors and provide them with an understanding of the history and importance of this gem.

Q: What is your biggest challenge?

A: Because the lighthouse is state owned we are limited in what we can do with the structure beyond emergency repairs and maintenance until the Maryland Park Service finalizes their plans and the General Assembly provides funding to accomplish the restoration. If we had to go it alone, it would be many years before we could tackle the myriad repairs that are necessary to turn it into a proper museum for all to enjoy. Some such repairs would be a total rewire and replumb of the house and installation of a modern HVAC system.

Q: Are there any upcoming events?

A: Open House from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on November 1.

Q: How can people get involved with your organization?

A: Send an e-mail to volunteer@pllps.org or visit us during an open house and talk to me. We can use all types of volunteers of all ages. Currently, we have two elementary/middle school aged volunteers who come with their grandmother and great aunt. We also have two octogenarians who are regulars.

Community Bank of the Chesapeake is proud to support the Point Lookout Lighthouse Preservation Society as a sponsor of their 4th annual “Feel the History 5k” race this Saturday, October 11. Registration for this event is still available online at http://www.feelthehistory5k.com/Register.html. Participants may also sign up at the event.